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What causes the formation of varicose veins ? Vein Treatment Center in Buffalo Niagara and www.VeinsVeinsVeins.com
Tuesday, August 6, 2013

 

 

There are lot of conditions that predispose to the formation of varicose veins and this includes heredity as it has been shown that male members of a family is more likely to pass on the genetic predisposition to form varicose veins than female members.  Other causes are race and gender.  Gender has been shown to be of equal risk in developing varicose veins. Posture such as being upright or occupations where there is lot of sitting or standing also predispose patients to develop varicose veins.

 

Height and weight are also predisposing factors and an increased association has been shown in patients who are overweight.  Overweight status has been shown to increase pressure at the saphenofemoral junction which increases venous insufficiency and predisposes patients to develop varicosities along the great saphenous vein system.

 

Occupations such as those where there is excessive sitting and standing and circulating hormones such as estrogen and progesterone during pregnancy also increase the risk of developing varicose veins.  Pregnancy has certainly been shown to increase the development of varicose veins especially in the second and third trimesters.  Primary valvular incompetence as well as secondary valvular incompetence are also risk factors which cause varicose veins.  Aging and incompetent perforator veins and arteriovenous communications are also shown to increase the likelihood of developing varicose veins.  Vein wall weakness and vein wall metabolic dysfunction have also been shown to cause enlargement of veins and thus development of varicose veins.  Phlebitis and deep vein thrombosis also increase the risk of developing varicose veins.

 

For more information about varicose veins, contact Hratch Karamanoukian, MD FACS  at the Vein Treatment Center with offices in Williamsville, New York and Clarence, New York or contact him at www.VeinsVeinsVeins.com or call 716-839-3638.

 

For information and treatment in the Los Angeles area contact Raffy Karamanoukian, MD FACS  at the Santa Monica Vein Center or go to www.SantaMonicaVeinCenter.com or call 310-998-5535.

 

www.VeinsVeinsVeins.com and www.VeinGuide.com are partners with www.PeaceBridgeHealthCare.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

Treatment of Post Thrombotic Syndrome in Buffalo Niagara - Canadian Patients are welcome - www.PeaceBridgeHealthCare.com
Thursday, August 8, 2013

 

 

One of the most significant sequela of having had a deep vein thrombosis is postthrombotic syndrome.  It has been shown to that up to 50% of patients with proximal deep vein thrombosis (DVT) will develop post thrombotic syndrome.  Fifty per cent of patients with post thrombotic syndrome due to proximal DVT will develop symptoms and 10% will develop venous stasis ulcers.

 

Multiple studies have shown that patients with proximal deep vein thrombosis are at significant risk of developing this devastating complication (post thrombotic syndrome) and therefore it is highly recommended that patients with any type of deep vein thrombosis and especially those in the proximal deep veins continue to wear compression stockings even when the deep vein thrombosis resolves.

 

There are some studies recently which have suggested that early thrombolysis of the deep vein thrombosis results in preservation of the venous valvular system and prevention of the deep venous insufficiency. This will likely have less long term complications such as venous obstruction and will surely reduce the likelihood of developing post thrombotic syndrome.  As such, clinicians are advocating a more aggressive interventional approach with fibrinolysis of proximal deep vein thrombosis as opposed to the traditional approach of  anticoagulation alone.

 

Fro more information about deep vein thrombosis and post thrombotic syndrome,  contact Hratch Karamanoukian, MD FACS at the Vein Treatment Center in Williamsville, New York and Clarence, New York or go to www.VeinsVeinsVeins.com or call 716-839-3638.

 

You can also request a free copy of Dr. Karamanoukian’s book called Post Thrombotic Syndrome by calling of requesting it online through his website www.VeinsVeinsVeins.com

 

www.VeinsVeinsVeins.com, www.VeinGuide,com are partners with www.PeaceBridgeHealthCare.com

 

 

DVT (deep vein thrombosis) is multifactorial - Dr. Karamanoukian - Treatment Varicose Veins Buffalo Niagara and Peace Bridge Healthcare
Saturday, August 10, 2013

 

 

 

It needs to be recognized that deep vein thrombosis formation is a multifactorial process, meaning that risk factors have to be present before deep vein thrombosis occurs in most patients.  This is reflected in a the scientific literature which clearly shows increased risk for developing deep vein thrombosis (DVT) for certain groups.  These include patients with Factor V Leiden mutations, those who use oral contraceptives and those who are obese.  As well there is an increase risk for tall and short people.

 

 

Patients with all risk factors who plan to travel, the benefits and risks of deep vein thrombosis prophylaxis need to be individually discussed.  Passengers who develop deep vein thrombosis have a risk factor and this is in order of frequency from the highest risk to the lower risk is

 

 

1. Thrombophilia. 

2. Use of oral contraceptive pill. 

3. Previous deep vein thrombosis. 

4. Recent injury to the lower extremity or surgery to the lower extremity.

5. Presence of varicose veins

6. Obesity.

 

 

Two or more combined risk factors markedly increase the risk of developing deep vein thrombosis. 

 

 

There is no evidence to support an increase risk of developing deep vein thrombosis when you consider the following risks:

 

 

1. Age or gender of travel passenger

2. Drinking alcohol during flight   

3. Use of sleeping pills

4. Seating arrangements 

5. Cabin environment

6. Physical activity or lack of physical activity during airplane travel

 

 

Of course even though there is no clear objective evidence to support the fact that physical activity or lack of physical activity does not significantly increase the risk of deep vein thrombosis, this should not be ignored.  Walking regularly every hour and exercising the lower extremities with foot pedal movements will activate the calf muscles and pump stagnant blood out of the legs. 

 

 

The use of class one support stockings have been shown to literally eliminate the risk of developing deep vein thrombosis in passengers known to be at higher risk of developing deep vein thrombosis.  

 

 

Low molecular weight heparin injections have also been shown to reduce the risk of developing deep vein thrombosis. 

 

 

Aspirin has been shown to be of no valve in preventing deep vein thrombosis as clotting in deep vein thrombosis formation is related to fibrin production and not to platelet activation.

 

 

To learn more about deep vein thrombosis contact Hratch Karamanoukian, MD FACS at the Vein Treatment Center or go to www.VeinsVeinsVeins.com and call 716-839-3638.

 

 

If you believe you have a deep vein thrombosis while on travel, go directly to an emergency room for evaluation with a duplex venous ultrasound or call your primary care physician for guidance.

 

 

www.VeinsVeinsVeins.com and www.VeinGuide.com are partners with www.PeaceBridgeHealthCare.com.

 

 

 

 

 

Clinical Presentation of Post Thrombotic Syndrome - Leg pain and swelling treated at Vein Treatment Center in Buffalo Niagara and Southern Ontario, Canada
Monday, August 12, 2013

 

 

Post thrombotic syndrome is a chronic debilitating condition that develops in up to 50% of patients after deep vein thrombosis (DVT).  It is the most common complication of deep vein thrombosis.  Post thrombotic syndrome is costly and has significant sequelae in quality of life (QOL) indicators and in terms of detrimental economic value to the U.S. economy.

 

Residual venous obstruction after deep vein thrombosis in valvular venous insufficiency in the deep veins leads to increased venous pressure also known as venous hypertension.  Venous hypertension results in reduced calf muscle perfusion, increased tissue permeability and the associated clinical manifestations of post thrombotic syndrome.  Post thrombotic syndrome is associated with groupings of symptoms and clinical signs which may vary from individual to individual.  Patients with post thrombotic syndrome complain of pain and heaviness in the legs, swelling and cramping in the legs, itching or tingling in the affected lower extremity.  These signs and symptoms may be intermittent or persistent even in the supine (bedrest) position.

 

Clinical signs that may be found on physical examination include swelling, telangiectasias, hyperpigmentation, stasis dermatitis, varicose veins and in severe cases, lipodermatosclerosis and venous stasis ulceration.

 

In general patients with proximal DVT of the lower extremity, 60% will have no residual symptoms and 30% will develop some degree of postthrombotic syndrome.  5% of patients or one in 20 patients will have severe post thrombotic syndrome.

 

Symptoms of post thrombotic syndrome usually begin within the first six months after DVT but can occur up to two years after the development of deep vein thrombosis.

 

For more information about post thrombotic syndrome, contact Dr. Karamanoukian for a free copy of this book called Post Thrombotic Syndrome or go to www.VeinsVeinsVeins.com and request a free copy.

 

For treatment of post thrombotic syndrome in the Buffalo Niagara region and Southern Ontario contact Hratch Karamanoukian, MD FACS at the Vein Treatment Center with offices in Williamsville, New York and Clarence, New York or call 716-839-3638 or go to www.VeinsVeinsVeins.com or www.VeinGuide.com.

 

www.VeinsVeinsVeins.com and www.VeinGuide.com are partners with www.PeaceBridgeHealthCare.com .

 

 

Elastic Compression Stockings for the Treatment of Post Thrombotic Syndrome - Buffalo Niagara Vein Expert at VeinsVeinsVeins.com
Monday, August 12, 2013

 

 

Clinical recommendations have been made in the journal Chest regarding the use of elastic compression stockings.  Kealon and colleagues published an article in Chest in 2002 which stated that in patients with acute symptomatic deep vein thrombosis of the legs, the use of elastic compression stockings is recommended.  The authors concluded that compression stockings should be worn for two years after deep vein thrombosis and beyond that if the patient has developed post thrombotic syndrome. They reported relief of clinical symptoms with the use of elastic compression stockings in patients with post thrombotic syndrome.

 

The authors also show that patients who place a low value on preventing post thrombotic syndrome or high valve on avoiding the inconvenience and discomfort of stockings are likely to decline to wear compression stockings.

 

Another study looked at the value of wearing thigh high versus below knee elastic compression stockings for the prevention of post thrombotic syndrome.  This article is published in the journal Blood in 2001 by Prandoni and colleagues.  They evaluated 267 patients with first episode of proximal deep vein thrombosis and randomized them to either thigh length or below knee length elastic compression stockings use for two years.  The study showed that post thrombotic syndrome develops in 32.6% of patients who wore thigh length stockings versus 35.6% of patients who wore below knee compression stockings. 

 

Stockings related side effects have been quantitated in these groups of patients – they found premature discontinuation of stockings use in one in five (20%) patients wearing thigh high stockings versus and one in seven (13%) patients wearing below knee length elastic compression stockings.  The authors concluded that thigh length elastic compression stockings do not offer a better protection against post thrombotic syndrome than wearing below knee elastic compression stockings and are less well tolerated.

 

A reasonable clinical approach for wearing elastic compression stockings to prevent post hrombotic syndrome is that elastic compression stockings are unlikely to cause harm but are difficult to apply, uncomfortable to wear, expensive to use, and require replacement every several months.

 

Phlebologists or vein specialists should prescribe knee length (20 -30 mm Hg) compression stockings to patients with residual leg pain or swelling after deep vein thrombosis. Physicians should continue to prescribe and recommend patients to wear them as long as long as there is symptoms relief or if the patient is able to tolerate wearing them without additional discomfort.   

 

Contraindications to the use of medical grade elastic compression stockings are symptomatic claudication from peripheral arterial disease or allergy to the material contained in the compression stockings.

 

To get a free copy of Dr. Karamanoukian’s book called Post Thrombotic Syndrome contact him directly through his websie www.VeinsVeinsVeins.com or call 716-839-3638 to get a free PDF copy.

 

 

 Post Thrombotic Syndrome and Deep Vein Thrombosis

 

 

For treatment and evaluation of post thrombotic syndrome in the Buffalo Niagara region and Southern Ontario contact Hratch Karamanoukian, MD FACS at the Vein Treatment Center with offices in Williamsville, New York and Clarence, New York or go to www.VeinsVeinsVeins.com, www.VeinGuide.com or call 716-839-3638.

 

www.VeinsVeinsVeins.com and www.VeinGuide.com are partners with www.PeaceBridgeHealthCare.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

ClariVein Procedure and Varicose Vein Treatment - Olean and Jamestown by Buffalo Vein Expert
Sunday, December 30, 2012

 

Dr. Hratch Karamanoukian is a member of the American College of Phlebology AND a Diplomate of the American Board of Phlebology. He can be contacted by calling 716-839-3638 or www.VeinsVeinsVeins.com or www.VeinGuide.com

 

 

Dr. Raffy Karamanoukian is a member of the American College of Phlebology AND a Diplomate of the American Board of Phlebology. He can be contacted by calling 310-998-5535 or www.SantaMonicaVeinCenter.com 

 

Drs. Raffy and Hratch Karamanoukian have authored 6 books about venous disease. The books are available on Amazon Kindle and Nook books for download.

 

 Our New York vein center provides comprehensive treatments for varicose and spider veins, including: 

 

 

 

  1. Clarivein procedure
  2. EVLT
  3. VNUS
  4. Venefit
  5. Microphlebectomy
  6. Ultrasound Guided Sclerotherapy
  7. Foam Sclerotherapy
  8. Laser Vein Treatment

 

 

Schedule an Appointment Now by Calling (716) 839-3638

 

 

Obesity and Venous Insufficiency
Sunday, February 3, 2013

 

The relationship between being overweight and developing venous insufficiency was an observation in population based studies that needed 'hard clinical data'. This information has now been answered sufficiently in a group of obese patients.

 

Researchers in Italy have shown, using measurements of abdominal pressure, that overweight patients have larger femoral vein diameters, more likely to have venous insufficiency than thin patients, and this has been correlated with highr intrabdominal pressures.

 

This study was published by Parmeggiani and colleagues in Ann Ital Chir. 2012 Nov 7.

Venefit Procedure Experts - Venefit Procedure News - Venefit Procedure FAQ and Information - Buffalo Vein Expert
Tuesday, January 1, 2013

Comprehensive Information about the Venefit Procedure (VNUS Closure) at your fingertips by Buffalo Vein Expert Hratch Karamanoukian MD FACS, a Board Certified Phlebologist (Vein Specialist) - VeinGuide.com and VeinsVeinsVeins.com

 

Dr. Hratch Karamanoukian is a member of the American College of Phlebology AND a Diplomate of the American Board of Phlebology. He can be contacted by calling 716-839-3638 orwww.VeinsVeinsVeins.com 

 

 

Dr. Raffy Karamanoukian is a member of the American College of Phlebology AND a Diplomate of the American Board of Phlebology. He can be contacted by calling 310-998-5535 orwww.SantaMonicaVeinCenter.com 

 

Drs. Raffy and Hratch Karamanoukian have authored 6 books about venous disease. The books are available on Amazon Kindle and Nook books for download.

 

 

VeinGuide.com provides comprehensive information about perforator venous reflux, perforator veins
Sunday, February 3, 2013

 

 

Get comprehensive information about perforator venous reflux disease from Buffalo Vein Expert Dr. Hratch Karamanoukian and VeinGuide.com and VeinsVeinsVeins.com

 

 

Video 1 : Perforator Venous Reflux Disease and healed venous stasis ulcer by Dr.  Karamanoukian of www.VeinGuide.com

 

Video 2 :  Dodd's Perforator Venous Reflux Disease (mid thigh perforator vein) by Dr. Karamanoukian of www.VeinGuide.com

 

Video 3 :  Cockett's II Perforator Venous Reflux Disease Treated by EVLT laser by Dr. Karamanoukian of www.VeinGuide.com

 

 

Dr. Hratch Karamanoukian is a member of the American College of Phlebology AND a Diplomate of the American Board of Phlebology. He can be contacted by calling 716-839-3638 orwww.VeinsVeinsVeins.com 

 

 

Dr. Raffy Karamanoukian is a member of the American College of Phlebology AND a Diplomate of the American Board of Phlebology. He can be contacted by calling 310-998-5535 orwww.SantaMonicaVeinCenter.com 

 

Drs. Raffy and Hratch Karamanoukian have authored 6 books about venous disease. The books are available on Amazon Kindle and Nook books for download.

 

Vein Wall Changes and Vein Valve Disesae in Chronic Venous Disease
Friday, February 8, 2013

 

 

Chronic venous disease is associated with significant morbidity and reduction in quality of life (QOL) indicators. The two major mechanisms of venous disease in chronic venous disease is :

 

1) Hypoxia (low oxygen concentration) in the venous bloodstream and vein wall and

 

2) Alteration in the wall tension of the vein wall which results from venous hypertension and venous valvular insufficiency

 

Venous hypertension results in superficial venous reflux, deep venous reflux (insufficiency) or superficial and deep venous insufficiency.

 

Researchers have shown that venous hypertension due to venous insufficiency results in the symptoms constellation which is common - leg pain, heaviness, fatigue, cramping, throbbing, restless legs and leg swelling.

 

If you want to read about compression stockings in detail, read our book(s) - they are free on request by email - we will send them to you in pdf form. Dr. Raffy Karamanoukian and I have written 6 books about venous isnufficiency and varicose veins.

 

 http://www.veinguide.com/about/26/dr.-karamanoukians-books.aspx - click to see our books

 

Comprehensive Information about the Venefit Procedure (VNUS Closure) at your fingertips by Buffalo Vein Expert Hratch Karamanoukian MD FACS, a Board Certified Phlebologist (Vein Specialist) - VeinGuide.com and VeinsVeinsVeins.com

 

Information about EVLT Never Touch at your fingertips from Santa Monica Vein Expert Dr. Raffy Karamanoukian, a Board Certified Vein Expert - www.SantaMonicaVeinCenter.com and www.Surgery90210.com

 

Dr. Hratch Karamanoukian is a member of the American College of Phlebology AND a Diplomate of the American Board of Phlebology. He can be contacted by calling 716-839-3638 orwww.VeinsVeinsVeins.com 

 

 

Dr. Raffy Karamanoukian is a member of the American College of Phlebology AND a Diplomate of the American Board of Phlebology. He can be contacted by calling 310-998-5535 orwww.SantaMonicaVeinCenter.com 

 

Drs. Raffy and Hratch Karamanoukian have authored 6 books about venous disease. The books are available on Amazon Kindle and Nook books for download.

 

Board Certified Phlebologists (Vein Specialists) in Los Angeles
Sunday, February 10, 2013

 

There is nothing wrong with having a general surgeon or radiologist to do your vein procedures. However, a dedicated surgeon who is also a phlebologist (vein specialist) brings a whole element of specialty care to the practice of vein disorders. At the Vein Treatment Center, the focus is not just one procedure for all patients, namely 'vein stripping', but rather a variety of procedures that are individualized and targeted to treat specific problems: varicose veins, truncal venous reflux disease, perforator venous reflux disease, vein related skin diseases, treatment of venous stasis ulcers, VNUS Closure, EVLT, topical lasers for spider and reticular veins, SEPS, etc. For a detailed evaluation, call the Vein Treatment Center for a consulation with Dr. Hratch Karamanoukian. Dr. Hratch Karamanoukian is triple board certified - in general surgery (American Board of Surgery), Cardiovascular Surgery (American Board of Thoracic Surgery) and Venous Surgery (American Board of Phlebology). We don't dabble in vein care, but treat it as a medical/surgical specialty. Ask your 'vein doctor' if he is Board Certified in Phlebology!

 

Dr. Raffy Karamanoukian is a diplomate of the American Board of Plastic Surgery (ABPS) and Diplomate of the American Board of Phlebology who collaborates with Dr. Hratch Karamanoukian at the Vein Treatment Center. Dr. Raffy Karamanoukian is Director of the Santa Monica Vein Center and is focused on the most advanced treatments for his patients with vein disorders. He also performs specialty muscle flaps and surgical wound treatments for patients with venous stasis ulcers. Dr. Raffy can be reached through his website www.SantaMonicaVeinCenter.com

 

We perform VenaCure EVLT Never Touch for perforator veins, saphenous veins, as well as VNUS Closure FAST. We also perform foam sclerotherapy, traditional sclerotherapy, ultrasound guided sclerotherapy and laser treatments for spider veins.

 

Call 716-839-3638 for Buffalo Niagara offices - www.VeinsVeinsVeins.com and www.VeinGuide.com

 

Call 310-998-5535 for Santa Monica and Beverly Hills, CA offices - www.Surgery90210.com and www.SantaMonicaVeinCenter.com

 

 

varicose veins, vein valves and venous insufficiency - Ask The Vein Experts and www.VeinGuide.com
Thursday, February 14, 2013

 

 

 

Dr. Hratch Karamanoukian is a member of the American College of Phlebology AND a Diplomate of the American Board of Phlebology. He can be contacted by calling 716-839-3638 or www.VeinsVeinsVeins.com 

 

Dr. Hratch Karamanoukian welcomes patients from Ontario, Canada. Our offices are minutes away from the Peace Bridge and patients can be in and out of the office in less than 90 minutes and expect to return to work the same day in 99% of cases.  Our offices will help make arrangements for those who want to spend the night in the U.S. - but 99% of our patients drive back home to Canada immediately after leaving the office.

 

Dr. Raffy Karamanoukian is a member of the American College of Phlebology AND a Diplomate of the American Board of Phlebology. He can be contacted by calling 310-998-5535 or www.SantaMonicaVeinCenter.com 

 

Drs. Raffy and Hratch Karamanoukian have authored 6 books about venous disease. The books are available on Amazon Kindle and Nook books for download.

 

 

Animation of Normal and Leaky Vein Valves - Animation of Venous Insufficiency - www.VeinGuide.com
Thursday, February 14, 2013

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dr. Hratch Karamanoukian is a member of the American College of Phlebology AND a Diplomate of the American Board of Phlebology. He can be contacted by calling 716-839-3638 or www.VeinsVeinsVeins.com 

 

Dr. Hratch Karamanoukian welcomes patients from Ontario, Canada. Our offices are minutes away from the Peace Bridge and patients can be in and out of the office in less than 90 minutes and expect to return to work the same day in 99% of cases.  Our offices will help make arrangements for those who want to spend the night in the U.S. - but 99% of our patients drive back home to Canada immediately after leaving the office.

 

Dr. Raffy Karamanoukian is a member of the American College of Phlebology AND a Diplomate of the American Board of Phlebology. He can be contacted by calling 310-998-5535 or www.SantaMonicaVeinCenter.com 

 

Drs. Raffy and Hratch Karamanoukian have authored 6 books about venous disease. The books are available on Amazon Kindle and Nook books for download.

 

 

Obesity is a risk factor for venous insufficiecy - www.VeinGuide.com for information about venous insufficiency and obesity Buffalo, New York Vein Specialists
Sunday, February 24, 2013

 

The relationship between being overweight and developing venous insufficiency was an observation in population based studies that needed 'hard clinical data'. This information has now been answered sufficiently in a group of obese patients.

 

Researchers in Italy have shown, using measurements of abdominal pressure, that overweight patients have larger femoral vein diameters, more likely to have venous insufficiency than thin patients, and this has been correlated with highr intrabdominal pressures.

 

So, this is the scientific backing for this emperical observation regarding the relationship between obesity and the incidence of venous insufficiency.

 

To be evaluated or treated for venous insufficiency, contact Dr Karamanoukian at the Vein Treatment Center with offices in Williamsville, NY, Clarence, NY and East Amherst, NY. Call 716-839-3638 or go to www.VeinsVeinsVeins.com

 

This study was published by Parmeggiani and colleagues in Ann Ital Chir. 2012 Nov 7.

 

 

 

 

9 Reasons Exercise Helps the Cardiovascular System
Tuesday, March 5, 2013

 

We are very busy warding off stresses related to these dire economic times. Some may wonder why it is important to exercise and why we need to set aside time from our hectic schedules to work out daily. If you are dragging yourself to complete your daily tasks and commitments, remember these reasons to exercise:


1. Exercise lowers the blood pressure - it is counterintuitive, but exercise does reduce blood pressure. Several minutes into your exercise routine, the arteries in your body vasodilate (get larger) and cause blood pressure to drop. A sustained exercise routine keeps your blood pressure low.

2. Exercise Lowers the bad cholesterol (LDL) - LDL or low density lipoprotein has been shown to decrease in individuals who exercise routinely. This is a healthy way to reduce the bad cholesterol.

3. Exercise raises the good cholesterol (HDL) - High density lipoprotein has been shown to increase with routine exercise. The higher your HDL, the less your cardiovascular risk for coronary events such as heart attacks and strokes.

4. Exercise lowers the triglycerides- the tryglycerides are the fatty molecules in the bloodstream.

5. Exercise lowers elevated blood glucose levels - Diabetics who exercise regularly develop increased lean body mass (muscle) as opposed to fat stores and this in turn picks up elevated blood sugar levels. Metabolism of excessive glucose levels can normalize glucose levels in individuals with diabetes.

6. Exercise reduces total body fat - Exercise reduces total body fat by metabolising it as an energy source. Gram for gram, fat contains 2.25 times the amount of calories as glucose and is therefore a preferred source of calories in individuals that are consuming more energy than they are taking in - such as in weight watchers.

7. Exercise helps burn calories - Simply put, exercise burns calories ! So, stop your sedantary life and get rolling on a regimented exercise program.

8. Exercise increases blood flow to the legs and coronary arteries - Exercise delivers more blood and therefore more oxygen and nutrients to the heart, brain and limbs.

9. Exercise reduces Stress - Last but not least, exercise reduces stress and is very relaxing to the brain and psyche.

I hope this article helps convince you to exercise routinely and live a 'heart healthy life".

You can read more about the heart by reading excerpts of my book on 'google books' - "Doctor, How Do I Live the Heart Healthy Way"

I invite you to share your personal thoughts on cardiovascular health with me.

 

Protein C Deficiency and Deep Vein Thrombosis, mutations PROC gene - Vein Treatment Center Buffalo New York
Wednesday, August 14, 2013

 

 

Protein C deficiency is a disorder that increases the risk of developing deep vein thrombosis (DVT).  Patients can have mild protein C deficiency or more severe deficiencies of this protein.  Patients with protein C deficiency are at risk of developing deep vein thrombosis and venous thromboembolism and pulmonary embolism. 

 

While it is known that most people with protein C deficiency will never develop blood clots, there are certain risk factors that add to the risk of developing venous thromboembolism and these factors include; increased age, surgical procedures, inactivity and pregnancy, among others.  Additional acquired or inherited disorders of blood clotting (Factor V Leiden, Prothrombin II) can also add to this risk of developing deep vein thrombosis and venous thromboembolism.

 

Mild protein C deficiency is found in approximately one in 500 individuals in The United States.  Severe protein C deficiency is rare and occurs in an estimated one in four million newborns.

 

Protein C deficiency is caused by mutations in the PROC gene.  This gene provides a gene product namely a protein, which is protein C, which is found in the blood stream and is involved in the blood clotting process.  Protein C inactivates circulating proteins that promotes blood clotting.  As such the deficiency of protein C places the patient in a prothrombotic or increased clot forming state.

 

Protein C deficiency is inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern.  This means that a single gene mutation and inheritance of the gene from a single parent is sufficient to cause mild protein C deficiency.  Inheritance of two copies of this gene defect causes severe protein C deficiency.

 

Dr. Karamanoukian has written an article about Protein S deficiency:

 

Taheri, PA, Eagle, BT, Karamanoukian, HL, Logue, G,Hoover, EL:  Functional Hereditary Deficiency of Protein S with Arterial Thrombosis. American Surgeon 1992; 58: pages 496-498.

 

 

 

For more information about protein C deficiency and deep vein thrombosis, contact Hratch Karamanoukian, MD FACS at the Vein Treatment Center with offices in Williamsville, New York and Clarence, New York.  You can also contact Dr. Karamanoukian through his website at www.VeinsVeinsVeins.com or by calling 716-839-3638.

 

www.VeinGuide.com and www.VeinsVeinsVeins.com are partners with www.PeaceBridgeHealthCare.com

 

 

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